South Carolina Attorney General

Alan Wilson was elected South Carolina's 51st Attorney General on November 2, 2010, re-elected to a second term on November 4, 2014 and re-elected to a third term on November 6, 2018. Since being elected, Wilson has focused on keeping South Carolina's families safe, defending their freedom and protecting their futures.

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The South Carolina Attorney General serves as South Carolina’s Chief Prosecutor, Chief Legal Officer, and Chief Securities Officer.

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News

From the Office of the Attorney General

Dec 07, 2021

Judge blocks vaccine requirement for federal contractors

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A federal judge has again sided with Attorney General Alan Wilson and today blocked the vaccine requirement for federal contractors. This is the third time courts have agreed with Attorney General Wilson and blocked vaccine mandates imposed by the Biden administration.

Nov 30, 2021

Federal Judge sides with AG Wilson and blocks healthcare worker vaccine mandate

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Today, federal Judge Terry A. Doughty in the U.S. District Court Western District of Louisiana (Monroe) sided with South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson and blocked the federal government from requiring healthcare workers to be vaccinated against COVID 19.

Nov 22, 2021

Attorney General Wilson joins coalition to support free speech of small business owners

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Attorney General Alan Wilson has joined a coalition of 16 state attorneys general in an amicus brief supporting free speech rights of small business owners. In Scardina v. Masterpiece Cakeshop Inc. before the Colorado Court of Appeals, the coalition argues that custom cakes are artistic works, and therefore, protected by the First Amendment.

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An Attorney General’s opinion attempts to resolve questions of law as the author believes a court would decide the issue.

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